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Thursday, 16 December 2010 00:00

Fox Visit

December 16, 2010Fox Visit [also in Wildlife] Turns out our newest staff member, Jessie Comba, is not only a fantastic educator and all-round great person, but she's pretty adept with a camera, too.  Today she captured some beautiful images of a pair of neighborhood fox that stop by the Environmental Center to romp around for a while.  One of them dug up a cached carcass and ran off with it.  Beautiful animals, aren't they?  Enjoy.  Thanks, Jessie! - Enrico http://seatuck.typepad.com/.a/6a00e54fa4e2d988330148c6d19dbf970c-800wi http://seatuck.typepad.com/.a/6a00e54fa4e2d988330148c6d1b2b4970c-800wi The cache is found http://seatuck.typepad.com/.a/6a00e54fa4e2d988330148c6d19e8a970c-800wi Digging http://seatuck.typepad.com/.a/6a00e54fa4e2d988330147e0c7b3ea970b-800wi The second fox kept an eye on the progress. http://seatuck.typepad.com/.a/6a00e54fa4e2d988330147e0c7ac5c970b-800wi The inevitable…
Monday, 25 October 2010 00:00

KIC It! (Take Two)

KIC 1010 -2  KIC - always there when we need them!   http://seatuck.typepad.com/.a/6a00e54fa4e2d9883301348877eb59970c-800wi This past Saturday over twenty student volunteers from Islip High School's Keep Islip Clean Club arrived to help us get ready for the big Spooktacular weekend and our inaugural Owl Prowl 5K run.  They worked on assembling boardwalks and clearing trails for the upcoming events.  Their work, which continued a project they started in April when they helped us get ready for our Earth Day grand opening, has focused on our "North Woods Trail." Thanks to KIC's help, the new trail is nearly complete and will be…
Tuesday, 11 March 2008 18:42

Giving Fish Room to Run

Years ago, many of Long Island's coastal tributaries would be shimmering with excited activity this time of year as the annual alewife runs returned. The small, silver-sided river herring would herald the arrival of spring as they raced in from the open sea to spawn in the cool, clean freshwater of our rivers and creeks. Alewife, like salmon, are diadromous, which means they hatch and spend the early part of their lives in freshwater before moving out to live the majority of their lives in the ocean. When they reach maturity they return to the freshwater systems of their birth…
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